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Canadian Cancer Society

We proposed a web donation process overhaul in order to augment the credibility and transparency of their mission to support people living with cancer.

Aron Chen, Venus Lau   |  3 week product proposal

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Our donation process augments the credibility and transparency of their mission to support people living with cancer. Through explicit donation distribution and content strategy, we hope to reach Canadian Cancer Society's emerging demographic of donors as they prepare for the future.

 

Roles

As one of the team's UX designers, I was in charge of initially forming the business problem and identifying our target audience. I also worked together with my teammates to create UX strategy deliverables such as journey frameworks. We are currently in the process of user testing low fidelity prototypes as part of a design sprint. I took part in creating mockups and user flows for this stage.

 

 

Overview

Background

The Canadian Cancer Society is a national, community-based organization of volunteers who's mission is the eradication of cancer and the enhancement of the quality of life of people living with cancer. It is the largest charitable funder of cancer research and treatment, as well as educational initiatives of cancer prevention. Having administered over $1.2 billion in cancer research funding since 1947, the Canadian Cancer Society continues to engage communities with 140,000 volunteers nationwide alongside programs such as Cancer Connection, Relay for Life, and Cancer Information Service.

 

Business problem

The Canadian Cancer Society has experienced a gradual decline in revenue from all of its major revenue streams. In the last five years, without fail, total revenue decreases from its previous reported year's amount. Annual giving, though still falling, has suffered the least significant change in the last five years. We interpret this as the most preferred and sustainable form of revenue the Canadian Cancer Society has at their disposal. 

The Canadian Cancer Society has experienced a gradual decline in revenue from all of its major revenue streams. In the last five years, without fail, total revenue decreases from its previous reported year's amount. Annual giving, though still falling, has suffered the least significant change in the last five years. We interpret this as the most preferred and sustainable form of revenue the Canadian Cancer Society has at their disposal. 

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Our approach

The magnitude of the Canadian Cancer Society's mission however, is not reflected by their donor base's response. Statistically speaking, near all of Canadians have experienced or will experience cancer in their lifetime. If so many people are to face this disease at some point, how did 60% of high priority research go unfunded in 2016? Shouldn't everyone be willing to contribute to research on cancers that need immediate research due to their incredibly low survival rates? 

We match this business problem with a demographic shift in the donor base. Charities throughout North America have begun to realize their need to remain relevant to a newer, perhaps more skeptical demographic of potential supporters.

 

Leveraging brand values

“People don’t just write cheques in good faith and trust that charities will use that money properly,” he said. “It’s becoming about communicating (with donors) over time. Not just ‘Thanks for your donation,’ but ‘In the next few months we’d like to tell you what we did with that money (Toronto Star, 2016).”

 

Focusing on expanding and augmenting the Canadian Cancer Society's brand pillar of integrity suited the business problem. We felt that as a group, expressing this brand pillar allows us to address the business problem more directly than the others.

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Process

Target audience

 

Our research helped us describe four segments of donors, of which the critical supporter related to our business problem the most. Additionally, targeting this segment addressing the growing skepticism towards charities without excluding the other segments. We fleshed out the persona through anecdotal research alongside online interviews.

 
 

Journey and pain points

We moved on the express the frustrations of a potential, yet cautious supporter on a journey framework. This helped us identify how the Canadian Cancer Society is currently tackling (or not addressing) the pain points of donors.

We ultimately chose to intervene in the latter half of the journey framework: the engage, entrust and extend stage. We felt that the opportunities to be transparent and credible while providing appropriate actionables over time were more readily available in these stages. It also helps generate more enthusiastic supports through strategic re-engagement.

 

Choosing our medium

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We decided to utilize the Canadian Cancer Society's existing users on their website and social media. Their website has over 13 million career visits, with 94% of them accessing cancer information services. Additionally, global statistics show websites as the most common preference for donating online, as opposed to mobile. Social media continues to rise as a influential communication tool alongside the younger demographic. Most millennials prefer to give online, and are most often inspired by social media to give. In light of our persona and business problem, this direction felt natural.

 

 

Our solution

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Through data visualization and content strategy, we hope to support the needs of the critical supporter with the best the Canadian Cancer Society has to offer them: their sincerity. We believe that by addressing the pain points of our persona, particularly those related to how charities handle money, we can move towards a new way of asking and social support.

We also identified how no one one can identify the necessary funds in order to fund priority research, or even describe what priority research could mean. We decided that by applying a visual and architectural priority of the cancers that need more treatment, as well as explicitly how much is needed, we would better allow the donor base to evaluate what's necessary for impact.

 

Health Belief Model

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The Health Belief Model was analyzed in order to guide the user flow in the context of health-promoting behaviours related to cancer. Understanding the model kept our process and user flows thoughtful.

 

 

Product overview

Landing page

Users are presented with extremely transparent information about the mission, percentage funds distribution and potential impact should they decide to support the Canadian Cancer Society. By providing the need-to-knows without needing to dig for it, we build a foundation for a donation process supported by trust.

 

 

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Research-based donations

We opted to present high-priority cancers in need of funding at the forefront of the donation process. While a potential donor is still allowed to donate however they wish, we establish the seriousness of the issue both with its priority within the system and its visual heirarchy.

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Filtering by priority

Search functions are provided with filtering options for the user to better find the cancer they wish to support. Again, priority funding is recognized visually by a daffodil beside it's listing. A user can also choose to see all of this year's priority cancer fundraisers.

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Donation options

We maintain some options from the current donation process by offering and option for organizations, as well as monthly giving and dedications. We allow donors to personalize their giving based on their own experiences.

Users can move between and be sure of where in the process they are with the top progress bar. The amount is also visible through the entire process.

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Payment method

A standard payment input field is offered alongside complementary options for email updates and a disclosure agreement. By giving their name, the type of cancer, and the amount related to their donation, their contribution will be featured in other parts of the website to encourage more or affirm the act of donating.

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Confirmation

A reactive breakdown of the total donation amount provides the user with a better idea of their contribution and its related costs and uses.

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Thanking the donor

The donation process ends with a thank you for their contribution. The user is prompted to scroll down for the next steps.

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Read about your impact

By providing real stories of cancer patients benefiting from research funding, we continue to celebrate the user's decision to donate. They join a community of other donors shown on a reel.

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Share your contribution

Social media is an incredible tool for non-profit organizations. A button allows the user the share about their contribution on social media to encourage and educate others. 

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Start a fundraiser

Leveraging Facebook fundraising is also offered should donors feel they want to elevate their donation by creating a way for friends and family to easily contribute as well.

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Campaign microsite

We also came up with a way for the Canadian Cancer Society to further excite supporters while targeting their most vulnerable cancer research funds. Yearly campaigns can use microsite structures similar to what the organization has used in the past for anniversaries. Yet again, we boldly present the priority research so that supporters can coordinate and give effectively to the non-profit.

In this example, we test a relay race concept that shows the current year's fundraising goals explicitly. Sections for 2018's fundraisers including background information and progress, as well as testimonials for further credibility.